Author: Marsha Powell

Lord Woolton Pie

Lord Woolton Pie

Lord Woolton Pie The classic World War 2 cheap vegetable pie with a delicious shortcrust pastry crust and loaded with lots of seasonal root vegetables. One of the best rationing meals during World War 2. Remember – A family didn’t always have meat with their […]

Meat & Potato Patties

Meat & Potato Patties

Meat & Potato Patties This meat and potato patties recipe came about because of the rationing during World War II. Americans were issued their first rationing booklet on May 4, 1942. These were distributed through teachers, PTA groups and other volunteers. Sugar was the first […]

Baked Spam & Bean Pie

Baked Spam & Bean Pie

Baked Spam & Bean Pie

In this day and age “spam” is a word that represents unwanted emails. Years ago it was a word that represented the successful repackaging of unwanted meats.

Spam is that can of pork, salt, water, sugar, potato starch and sodium nitrite that first came off the assembly lines 80 years ago during the Great Depression. It was invented as a way to peddle the then-unprofitable pork shoulder,  according toThe Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America. It was the invention of Jay Hormel, son of George Hormel who founded the Hormel company which pioneered canned pork products in Austin, Minn. in the late 1920s.

According to the company’s Spam Museum, the brother of a Hormel executive came up with the name — a catch-all word for spiced ham — in a naming contest and got $100 as a reward. The new product was introduced on July 5, 1937.

Despite the amount of early Spam ads aimed at housewives who wanted cheap, quick meals requiring almost no prep, some ladies were not ready to prepare or eat meat that didn’t need to be refrigerated. But it didn’t take long for the U.S. military to find a use for the food innovation. During World War II, America shipped out over 100 million cans of Spam to the Pacific, where it made an inexpensive yet filling meal for U.S. troops. Eventually, Spam became one of the most celebrated four-letter words in World War II.

To keep up Spam sales up after the war, the company hired singers to tout the product and even had a radio show called Music With the Hormel Girls. Whatever the reason, it worked: Hormel produced its billionth can i 1959 amid rising sales. And still the Spam eating Vikings in the 1970s Monty Python’s Flying Circus skit is the pop culture Spam reference most people will remember.

Baked Spam & Bean Pie

May 22, 2019
: 4
: 20 min
: 20 min
: 40 min
: Easy

By:

Ingredients
  • 1 12-ounce can Spam
  • 2 Tbsp. maple-flavored syrup
  • 1 21-ounce can pork & beans in tomato sauce, partially drained
  • 2 Tbsp. hot dog relish
  • 1 tsp. instant minced onion
  • 1/4 cup shredded sharp process American cheese
Directions
  • Step 1 Cut Spam into 8 slices and brush each with maple-flavored syrup. Arrange the meat around the inner edge of an 8-inch pie plate.
  • Step 2 In a saucepan, combine the pork & beans, hot dog relish and minced onion. Bring to a boil.
  • Step 3 Pour the bean mixture into the pie plate and sprinkle with shredded cheese.
  • Step 4 Bake at 350 degrees F. for 20 minutes. Serves 4.
War Cake

War Cake

War Cake During the early months of 1942, the Japanese conquered the Philippines. This cut off the sugar imports to the United States. Shipments from other areas of the world were curtailed by 50% because the ships had to be used for military purposes. There […]

Creamed Chipped Beef on Toast

Creamed Chipped Beef on Toast

Creamed Chipped Beef on Toast Did anyone have this when you were a kid?  Growing up in the ’50’s, we had it every so often. Call me crazy, but I love the stuff. It’s hard to find much history on this. The exact origins of this […]

Ike Clanton’s Tomato Soup

Ike Clanton’s Tomato Soup

Ike Clanton’s Tomato Soup

You all remember who Ike Clanton was, don’t you? Yup. He was one of those guys who fought the Earps at the OK Corral.

Tombstone is one of my all time favorite movies. We’ve watched it so many times that I do believe we could both recite it.

As I was looking around the Internet for some more great cowboy recipes I happen to come across an article about Ike Clanton. Did you know that he had a restaurant in Tombstone?

Joseph Isaac “Ike” Clanton opened the very first restaurant in Tombstone on December 21, 1878. Clanton placed an order through L.M. Jacobs in Tuscon for groceries. He sent a courier with $150 to pay for $350 worth of groceries. He promised to pay the balance by February 1st.

Clanton’s food order included dried apples and peaches, sugar, lard, coffee, canned tomatoes, raisins, salt, pepper, cornmeal, syrup and flour.

Unfortunately, Tombstone was quite small and there wasn’t enough people to sustain a restaurant. By March 1879, the restaurant was closed and Clanton left town.

Shortly thereafter, the silver mines began to open and Tombstone became a thriving community. The population is believed to have been about 15,000 by 1881.

Wyatt Earp on the left and Doc Holliday on the right.

On October 26, 1881 at around 3:00 PM, Wyatt Earp along with his brothers Virgil and Morgan and his friend Doc Holliday faced the Clanton-McLaury gang in a shootout. It’s said to have happened at the OK Corral, but it was really at an empty lot up the street.

Virgil and Morgan were both wounded. Tom and Frank McLaury along with Billy Clanton were all killed. Ike Clanton and Billy Claiborne ran for their lives.

You all know how Wyatt Earp went after the Cowboys and shot and killed most of them. Ike left Tombstone. He, along with his brother Phineas became cattle rustlers around Arizona. On June 1, 1887 they were confronted by detective Jonas V. Brighton. Phineas surrendered, but Ike resisted and was shot and killed.

So, there you have the history of Ike Clanton. I don’t know about you all, but I find this stuff fascinating! Below is the recipe for Tomato Soup that was served in Ike’s restaurant.

Ike Clanton's Tomato Soup

May 22, 2019
: 4
: 30 min
: 20 min
: 50 min
: Easy

By:

Ingredients
  • 2 T. butter or margarine
  • 1 carrot, sliced
  • 1 turnip, sliced
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 1 stalk celery, sliced
  • 4 T. flour
  • 4 c. beef broth
  • 28 oz. can of tomatoes or 3 c. chopped fresh tomatoes
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 pinch grated nutmeg
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 1⁄8 tsp. freshly ground pepper
Directions
  • Step 1 Melt the butter in a large pot, then throw in the carrot, turnip, onion and celery and cook over medium-high heat. When the mixture turns golden, add flour. Cook for two minutes. Add the remaining ingredients and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low and cook until vegetables are tender. Force the mixture through a sieve, or purée and strain it. Season with salt and pepper. Place back on the stove and bring to a boil. Serve warm with croutons.
Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns I grew up in New England – just north of Boston. When Ash Wednesday rolled around, my Mom would be at the bakery down the street to buy some Hot Cross Buns. The bakery always used candied fruit instead of the raisins. […]

Gingerbread

Gingerbread

Gingerbread Most people relate gingerbread with the holidays. Mom would make it any time of the year. Usually she would serve it warm with a big dollop of whipped cream on top.  Yummy!  Do you all know where this wonderful dessert came from? In Medieval […]

Cheez-Its

Cheez-Its

Cheez-Its

How many of you can go into your pantry and find a box of Cheez-Its?  You’ll find more than one in mine. I love these things! Did you know you can make them at home?  They taste just as good or better than what you’ll buy and they’re really easy to make.  You’ll find the recipe at the bottom of this post.

But before we get to that, here’s a bit of history behind the crackers.

Cheez-Its were invented in Dayton, Ohio in 1921 by Weston Green.  He was the president of the Green & Green Company. They made lots of different crackers but Cheez-Its are their most famous.  These are made with wheat flour and real cheese and then seasoned with several different flavorings. It’s said that paprika is the one seasoning that gives them that special flavor. When these little crackers were first released they were referred to as “a dainty cheese cracker”.

In 1929 the Loose-Wiles Biscuit Company bought out the Green & Green Company and then renamed themselves the Sunshine Biscuit Company. In 1996 Sunshine was bought out by the Keebler Company. Yup! Those elves are making Cheez-Its in their trees.  In 2001 Kellogg’s acquired Keebler as a subsidiary and as of 2019 Kellogg’s is still the owner of Cheez-Its.

Cheez-Its have been hailed for having a unique taste. At one time their slogan said they were like a baked Rarebit. If you’ve never had a Welsh Rarebit, then you should try some. I’ll see if I can find a recipe.

At one time these little cheese crackers weren’t very well liked. Mainly because there weren’t any standardized bakery procedures. Sometimes there was too much oil or not enough and the same with yeast and the other ingredients. Today, it’s a totally different story. Bakery procedures have changed over the last 30 years and all product ingredients are standardized so they always come out the same.

Cheez-Its now have over 40 different varieties and flavors like Pepper Jack and mozzarella as well as reduced fat and Hot & Spicy which is made with Tabasco.

There have been lots of different television commercials and several different slogans like “You’ll Like Cheez-It”, “The Big Cheese” and (my personal favorite) “Get Your Own Box”.  A talking wheel of cheese is often shown in the commercials as their mascot. You’ll see him in various stages of maturity but most often as a prankster adolescent.

Let me get this posted for you so I can go find my box!

Cheez-Its

May 22, 2019
: 8
: 30 min
: 20 min
: 50 min
: Fairly Easy

The Prep Time doesn't include the chill time.

By:

Ingredients
  • 8 ounces Freshly Shredded Extra-Sharp Cheddar Cheese
  • 1/4 cup Butter, (1/2 a stick), softened
  • 1 teaspoon Coarse Sea Salt
  • 1 cup All-Purpose Flour
  • 2-3 tablespoons Cold Water
  • Optional Mix-Ins:
  • Black Pepper
  • Garlic Powder
  • Onion Powder
  • Dried Herbs
  • Paprika
  • Chili Powder
Directions
  • Step 1 Preheat oven to 375°F. Line two baking trays with parchment paper and set aside.
  • Step 2 In the bowl of a standing mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, place the cheese, butter, salt, and flour. Stir to combine until the mixture is crumbly. Add 2 tablespoons of water and mix until a dough forms (this may take a minute or so). If needed, add an additional tablespoon of water.
  • Step 3 Divide the dough in half and roll into logs. Wrap the logs of dough in plastic wrap and chill in the refrigerator for one hour.
  • Step 4 Roll each log of dough out on a lightly floured surface to 1/8-inch thickness. (The crackers will puff up in the oven.) Use a dough scraper or a straight-edge ruler and a pastry wheel to cut the crackers into one-inch squares. Spread on the baking trays with space between the crackers.
  • Step 5 With a toothpick, make holes in the centers of each cracker. Bake until the crackers are crispy, 15 to 20 minutes. Make sure the crackers do not overcook and brown too much!
  • Step 6 To re-crisp leftover crackers, toss on a baking sheet and heat in the oven or toaster oven for a few minutes.
Fried Green Tomatoes

Fried Green Tomatoes

Fried Green Tomatoes How many of you have ever had Fried Green Tomatoes?  Raise your hands!  Yup. Lots of you. Me too. Do you like them?  I’m not crazy about them, but I’ll eat them if they’re put in front of me. They have a […]

Popovers – 1901 Version

Popovers – 1901 Version

Popovers – 1901 Version How many of you have ever had popovers?  My mother would serve them hot with lots of butter. When I got married I would make them for my family and fill them with jam for the kids.  Some of the fancy […]

Mashed Potato Cakes

Mashed Potato Cakes

Mashed Potato Cakes

As you all have seen, the Depression Era brought about lots of recipes. Some of them are really good and others were made out of necessity and weren’t that good.

Finding any kind of history behind this recipe was hard. All I could find was that potatoes were plentiful. They could be grown easily just about anywhere.

If there was anything to add to these, it was because there just might have been some leftovers.  I’ve made these many times when I have leftover mashed potatoes. Usually I add minced onion and some grated cheese along with salt and pepper and a dash of garlic powder.  Crumbled bacon is always good, too.

Mashed Potato Cakes

May 22, 2019
: 4
: 20 min
: 10 min
: 30 min
: Easy

This is the basic recipe. I've seen others where all kinds of leftovers were added to make these more of a meal.

By:

Ingredients
  • Leftover mashed potatoes (about 2 cups)
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/4 cup of all-purpose flour
  • 2-3 Tablespoons of bacon grease or other oil for frying
Directions
  • Step 1 Mix together the potatoes, egg and flour
  • Step 2 The batter should be pretty stiff, not like regular pancake batter
  • Step 3 Melt the grease or oil in a skillet on medium heat and let the skillet get good and warm
  • Step 4 Making heaping spoonfuls of the batter and add to the skillet
  • Step 5 Mash the batter down with a fork or spatula
  • Step 6 Cook until browned and then flip
  • Step 7 Once both sides are brown transfer to a paper plate or paper towels to soak up the grease
  • Step 8 Serve with syrup, gravy, applesauce or just buttered
Depression Era Hoover Stew

Depression Era Hoover Stew

Depression Era Hoover Stew During the depression era there was a soup called “Hoover Stew”. The recipe varied depending on what you had available. This recipe dates from the depression years and on through WWII; and was then a luxury or celebration meal, since it […]

Tomato Soup Cake

Tomato Soup Cake

Tomato Soup Cake Have you ever had a tomato soup cake?  My Mom didn’t make it, but I had several friends whose mothers would make it. They’d have it in their lunches at school. I finally got around to making one after I was married. […]

Old Fashioned Rice Pudding

Old Fashioned Rice Pudding

Old Fashioned Rice Pudding

This is a dessert my Mom would make often. She never did put the raisins in it, but I did after I got married.

Rice pudding is a dish made from rice mixed with water or milk and other ingredients such as cinnamon and raisins. There are so many different ways to make it. Each country has it’s own variations.

When used as a dessert, it is commonly combined with a sweetener such as sugar. Such desserts are found on many continents, especially Asia where rice is a staple. Some variants are thickened only with the rice starch, others include eggs, making them a kind of custard.

Old Fashioned Rice Pudding

May 22, 2019
: 4
: 30 min
: 1 hr
: 1 hr 30 min
: Fairly Easy

By:

Ingredients
  • 3 1/2 cups milk
  • 1/2 cup uncooked long grain rice
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Salt
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1 Teaspoon Vanilla
  • Ground Cinnamon optional, for garnish
Directions
  • Step 1 Combine the milk, sugar, rice and salt in a large saucepan. Over medium to low heat, cook the mixture while stirring constantly until it starts to boil. Resist the urge to turn the heat up to make it boil faster. It needs to come up to a slow boil.
  • Step 2 After the mixture has come to a boil, pour it into a buttered 1 1/2 quart baking dish. Cover it with foil and place into your pre-heated 325 degree oven. Bake for 45 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes. At the end of 45 minutes, add the raisins and vanilla. Bake another 15 minutes until the rice is tender. Sprinkle with cinnamon, serve warm or chilled.
Depression Era Homemade Bread

Depression Era Homemade Bread

Depression Era Homemade Bread During the Great Depression, many families had to cook with basic ingredients and learn to live with less. These families learned some important lessons on frugal living and limiting waste that we could all learn from today. This is just one […]

Chuckwagon Beans

Chuckwagon Beans

Chuckwagon Beans A cowboy’s life was much less glamorous then what’s portrayed in the movies and on television.  The work was difficult and monotonous. Depending on the season, cowboys worked in blistering heat or bitter cold. Their diet varied little from meal to meal. It […]

Fruit Cobbler

Fruit Cobbler

Fruit Cobbler

Fruit cobblers were a favorite among the chuckwagon cooks. They usually had to improvise while out on the trail. Most times they didn’t have all the ingredients, so they would improvise.

The chuckwagon cooks always carried an array of spices that they kept under lock and key. Most spices were quite hard to come by back then and could be quite expensive.  Most times they would have cinnamon, all spice, pumpkin spice and nutmeg. At all times, they would be used sparingly.

The favorite among the cowboys was usually a peach cobbler with a biscuit topping. But, if peaches were unavailable, then they would have wild berries such as Wild cranberry, Huckleberry, Golden currants, blackberries, strawberries and dewberries.

The chuckwagon cook sometimes carried dried fruits which would have to be rehydrated in water before cooking.

The earliest meaning of the word “cobbler” refers to one who makes and mends shoes. In slang it came to mean “to put together clumsily or roughly” .  Thus, this luscious dessert was called a Cobbler because there’s no precision for making the crust like there would be in a pie.

Here’s the recipe for a fruit cobbler that’s been slightly modernized with oven temps. Remember – the chuckwagon cook would make this in a large iron skillet over an open fire.

Fruit Cobbler

May 22, 2019
: 8
: 20 min
: 25 min
: 45 min
: Easy

By:

Ingredients
  • 2 pounds frozen fruit or slightly less if fresh
  • 1 1/4 cups white sugar
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons white sugar
  • 1/4 cup softened butter
  • 2/3 cup milk
  • 1 egg, beaten
Directions
  • Step 1 Combine fruit and 1 ¼ cups of the sugar with 1 ½ tablespoons flour. Pour into a 9×9 inch baking pan and spread evenly and top with 1 ½ tablespoons of butter.
  • Step 2 Mix 1 ½ cups flour, baking powder, 2 tablespoons sugar, and salt with the rest of the butter until it looks like cornmeal. Then, add milk and egg and stir to combine. Drop batter over fruit mixture in the pan.
  • Step 3 Bake at 400 degrees from 20 to 30 minutes.
Sourdough Biscuits

Sourdough Biscuits

Sourdough Biscuits Here’s another chuckwagon recipe. I’m sure these are wonderful! I may just have to give these a try in the next day or two. Sourdough biscuits were a delicacy whether on the trail or at the ranch. Once a cook got a good […]

Buffalo Stew

Buffalo Stew

Buffalo Stew This recipe for Buffalo Stew is funny. I think you all will get a kick out of it. But first, here are some rules for the Chuckwagon: No one eats until Cookie calls When Cookie calls, everyone comes a runnin’Hungry cowboys wait for […]

Red Flannel Hash

Red Flannel Hash

Red Flannel Hash

How many of you are fascinated by the Old West?  You know – cowboys, trail drives, roundups, etc.

There are alot of great recipes that came from those trail drives. Some sound really good (like the Red Flannel Hash). Others don’t. But then, you have some that are just plain funny to read.  I’ll post a couple of those.

Did you know that until the year 1866, there were no such things as chuckwagons?  I was surprised, too.  I thought they always had them.

The chuckwagon was invented by Colonel Charles Goodnight for his crews. He was also the co-founder of the Goodnight-Loving cattle trail.

TheTrail ran from Young County, Texas, southwest to Horsehead Crossing on the Pecos River, up the Pecos to Fort Sumner, New Mexico, and on north to Colorado.

The first drive started in 1867. These went on for twenty years moving over 9,000,000 head of cattle.

Colonel Goodnight purchased a war-surplus munitions wagon and with the help of his cook, outfitted it with all the necessary equipment for cooking on the trail drives. These wagons would also carry extra bedrolls, shovels, axes, rope and even some personal items.

I came across a couple of very old recipe booklets with chuckwagon recipes in them. I hope you’ll enjoy them along with the history associated with them.

Red Flannel Hash

May 22, 2019
: 4
: 20 min
: 20 min
: 40 min
: Easy

A great way to use left over corned beef is to add a few new ingredients and create Red Flannel Hash. Who knows who came up with the beets, but it really is colorful, and sticks to the ribs.

By:

Ingredients
  • 1 ½ Cups chopped corned beef
  • 1 ½ Cups chopped cooked beets
  • 1 Medium onion, chopped
  • 4 Cups chopped cooked potatoes
Directions
  • Step 1 Chop ingredients separately, then mix together.
  • Step 2 Heat all ingredients in a well- greased skillet, slowly, loosen around the edges, and shake to prevent scorching.
  • Step 3 After a nice crust forms on bottom, turn out on a warmed plate and serve.
  • Step 4 If it seems a little dry add a little beef broth. Try with a couple poached eggs, for a hearty meal.
Golden Potato Salad

Golden Potato Salad

Golden Potato Salad I grew up in New England. When summer rolled around, my Dad would bring out the grill. He would stock up on charcoal and lighter fluid.  I remember that he even built a picnic table.  It seems like he’d be cooking something on […]

Chicken A La King

Chicken A La King

Chicken a La King The 1950’s.  How many of you are considered Baby Boomers?  I know I am.  Historians use the word “boom” to describe the ’50’s because of the booming economy and the so-called “baby boom”. It all began in 1946. The war was […]

Date Bars

Date Bars

Date Bars

I can remember having these when I was a kid. But, I don’t remember if my Mom made them or my Grandma.  I do remember that I loved them!

I couldn’t find too much in the way of history about these. Most believe that they came over to Canada from Scotland.

Some recipes call for raisins and others call for figs.  If you know of any other history, please let me know in the comments.

Date Bars

May 22, 2019
: 12
: 20 min
: 20 min
: 40 min
: Easy

By:

Ingredients
  • 8 ounces finely chopped dates
  • 1 tablespoon flour
  • 1 cup hot water
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 cup sifted all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups rolled oats (not the quick cooking kind)
  • 1/3 cup melted shortening OR canola oil
Directions
  • Step 1 Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
  • Step 2 Combine dates and 1 tablespoon of the flour in a small pan. Add the water and simmer the mixture for 10 minutes or until thickened. Add the vanilla. Remove the mixture from the heat and set aside.
  • Step 3 Combine the brown sugar with the flour, baking soda and oats. Add the shortening or oil, stirring as you pour. Combine but don’t over mix.
  • Step 4
  • Step 5 Spread 1/2 of the oat mixture in the bottom of a buttered or greased 12 x 8 x 2 pan, and press the dough firmly with your fingers.
  • Step 6 Spread the date mixture over the bottom layer carefully, taking care not to disturb the bottom crust.
  • Step 7 Sprinkle the remaining oat mixture over the top of the date filling, pat smooth.
  • Step 8 Bake for 20 minutes or until done. The top should be lightly golden brown. Cool the bars in the pan then cut into 2″ bars.
Original Boston Cream Pie

Original Boston Cream Pie

Original Boston Cream Pie Boston Cream Pie is one of those desserts that proves you’re a New Englander if you love it!  I’d keep one in the fridge all the time if I could. The true history of Boston Cream Pie is cloaked in mystery.  […]

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie My mother used to make rhubarb pie. I’m not sure if she put strawberries in it or not. My sister and I never got any. I think she shared it with my grandmother . It grew early in the Spring right beside […]

Real Boston Baked Beans

Real Boston Baked Beans

Real Boston Baked Beans

When I was a kid, my grandmother had a cast iron stove in her kitchen. My grandfather would bring up a bucket of coal from the basement and Gramma would stoke up the fire. Of course, this would just happen on a cold winter night.

Then, Gramma would get down her bean pot and mix up the beans. They would go into the oven shortly before they went to bed. In the morning you would wake up with the marvelous aroma of baked beans and a warm kitchen.

Today, the beans are cooked in a crock pot or in a slow oven.  The aroma is still there, but in my opinion, there’s always something missing with that warm kitchen.

Originally, baked beans were made by the Native Americans along with their cornbread. When the Pilgrims landed in 1620, the Indians taught them how to make the beans their way.

The triangular trade of slaves in the 18th century helped to make Boston an exporter of rum, which is produced by the distillation of fermented molasses. It was at that time, molasses was added to local baked bean recipes, creating Boston Baked Beans. In colonial New England, baked beans were traditionally cooked on Saturdays and left in the brick ovens overnight. This was done so that on Sunday people could have a hot meal and still comply with Sabbath restrictions.

As time wore on, baked beans, frankfurters and brown bread became a typical Saturday night supper.  I can remember having it many times. Today, I still do it.

Real Boston Baked Beans

May 20, 2019
: 12
: 20 min
: 6 hr
: 18 hr 20 min
: Easy

The total time includes the time for soaking the beans.

By:

Ingredients
  • 1 pound dry beans (navy beans, soldier beans, Great Northern beans, etc.)
  • 3/4 pound salt pork
  • 3 tablespoons molasses
  • 3 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard
Directions
  • Step 1 Wash the beans in a colander or strainer
  • Step 2 pick over the beans to remove any pebbles or debris. Put in a large saucepan and add water to cover the beans by an inch. Soak overnight.
  • Step 3 In the morning, bring the beans to a boil. Boil until the skins break when you blow across a few beans on a spoon. Place a layer of beans in the bottom of a crockery bean pot. Score the salt pork, cutting through the pork but leaving the rind intact. Place about 1/2 pound of the salt pork in the pot. Add most of the remaining beans and water. Place the remaining 1/4 pound of salt pork in the pot. Cover with the remaining beans. Add the molasses, brown sugar, salt, and mustard. Cover with additional water. Place the lid on the pot.
  • Step 4 Bake in a 300 degrees F oven for at least 6 hours, adding water as needed. You may want to use a drip pan under the pot in the oven – just in case.
Original Toll House Cookies

Original Toll House Cookies

Original Toll House Cookies Today, the most popular cookie in America is Toll House Cookies.  Do you know where they originated at? The very first chocolate chip cookies was invented by Ruth Wakefield at the Toll House Inn in Whitman, Massachusetts during the 1930’s.  It […]